In Spies We Trust

In Spies We Trust

The Story of Western Intelligence

Book - 2013
Average Rating:
2
Rate this:
In Spies We Trust reveals the full story of the Anglo-American intelligence relationship - ranging from the deceits of World War I to the mendacities of 9/11 - for the first time.Why did we ever start trusting spies? It all started a hundred years ago. First we put our faith in them to help win wars, then we turned against the bloodshed and expense, and asked our spies instead to deliver peace and security. By the end of World War II, Britain and America were cooperatingeffectively to that end. At its peak in the 1940s and 1950s, the 'special intelligence relationship' contributed to national and international security in what was an Anglo-American century.But from the 1960s this 'special relationship' went into decline. Britain weakened, American attitudes changed, and the fall of the Soviet Union dissolved the fear that bound London and Washington together. A series of intelligence scandals along the way further eroded public confidence. Yet even inthese years, the US offered its old intelligence partner a vital gift: congressional attempts to oversee the CIA in the 1970s encouraged subsequent moves towards more open government in Britain and beyond. So which way do we look now? And what are the alternatives to the British-American intelligence relationship that held sway in the West for so much of the twentieth century? Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones shows that there are a number - the most promising of which, astonishingly, remain largely unknown tothe Anglophone world.
Published: Oxford :, Oxford University Press,, 2013.
Edition: First edition.
ISBN: 9780199580972
0199580979
Branch Call Number: 327.124 JEF
Characteristics: ix, 297 pages :,illustrations ;,24 cm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Quotes

Add a Quote

s
SEBoiko
May 15, 2014

For the Wilson administration, suppressing German operations was more important than upholding the cause of Irish freedom.

s
SEBoiko
May 15, 2014

The German emperor took a personal interest in Indian nationalism.

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number Find Series Titles and Similar Books With Novelist

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at DBRL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top